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OPC-3: The most powerful antioxidant in the world?

Discussions about Holistic Health and Alternative Medicine.

Re: Is OPC-3 the most powerful antioxidant in the world?

Postby Scepcop » 13 Oct 2012, 17:05

Here is more from Walt Goodridge about why "good products" aren't sold in stores:

"Innovative new products can't just start out being sold in stores.
There is competition for limited shelf space. There are relationships with
wholesalers that have to be cultivated and convinced before they
will distribute a product. There is FDA approval.
You've heard stories of upstart entrepreneurs selling their product
out the back of their station wagons, building a clientele,
growing their business bit by bit. That's why.

If today, you developed a product that you wanted sold,
the smartest strategy would be to use "word of mouth marketing"
through independent distributors. You can make more money,
cut out the middle man (the stores) and go directly to the consumer.

So, to use a product's
availability in major, well-established, cut-throat competitive chains
and supermarkets as a determinant of its effectiveness or credibility
is not wise."
“Devotion to the truth is the hallmark of morality; there is no greater, nobler, more heroic form of devotion than the act of a man who assumes the responsibility of thinking.” - Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged
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Re: Is OPC-3 the most powerful antioxidant in the world?

Postby NinjaPuppy » 13 Oct 2012, 17:25

I find that to be accurate.

One example is Oxyclean. Rather than sound like a TV commercial touting the joys of cleaner clothes, here's the link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OxiClean.

A few years later, this product can now be found as an additive to just about every cleaning product imaginable. At first it was only available by calling the toll free number, blah, blah, blah. Now it's making millions of dollars. That stuff is worth it's weight in gold.
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Re: Is OPC-3 the most powerful antioxidant in the world?

Postby Scepcop » 15 Oct 2012, 23:24

It looks like OPC does have studies backing up its benefits.

http://healthlibrary.epnet.com/GetConte ... d=21765#P3

Therapeutic Uses

The best-documented use of OPCs is to treat chronic venous insufficiency, a condition closely related to varicose veins. In both of these conditions, blood pools in the legs, causing aching, pain, heaviness, swelling, fatigue, and unsightly visible veins. Fairly good preliminary evidence suggests that OPCs from pine bark or grape seed can relieve the leg pain and swelling of chronic venous insufficiency.8-12,74 However, no studies have evaluated whether regular use of OPCs can make visible varicose veins disappear, or prevent new ones from developing.

Other small, double-blind trials suggest that OPCs may help reduce swelling caused by injuries or surgery.13-15

Evidence from one small, double-blind trial suggests that OPCs from bilberry and grape seed may reduce the general fluid retention and swelling that can occur in premenstural syndrome (PMS).50

One large study found some evidence that use of OPCs from pine bark might help prevent the leg blood clots that can develop on a long airplane flight.51

Some studies suggest OPCs from pine bark, alone or with arginine, may be helpful for erectile dysfunction (impotence).52,53,66 For example, in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 124 men (aged 30-50) with moderate erectile dysfunction were randomized to take Prelox (a formulation of pine bark extract and arginine) or placebo for 6 months. The men who took Prelox experienced improvement in their condition over placebo.66

In a double-bind, placebo-controlled study of 61 children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), use of OPCs from pine bark (at a dose of 1 g per kg per day) appeared to improve some measurements of disease severity.62

Two small, double-blind pilot studies suggest that OPCs from pine bark might help reduce asthma symptoms.42,54

OPCs are also often recommended for allergies, but an 8-week, double-blind trial of 49 individuals found no benefit with grape seed extract.19 On a slightly more positive note, a preliminary trial involving 39 people with seasonal allergies found that those who took OPCs at least 5 weeks before the start of the season experienced more symptom relief compared to the control group. And those that took OPCs for a longer period of time (eg, 7-8 weeks before the season) seemed to have better results.65

According to several studies, OPCs might improve blood sugar control in people with diabetes.55 In addition, a small study found evidence to support the use of pine bark extract for improving the symptoms and healing time of foot ulcers, a common complication in people with diabetes.75

Some evidence suggests that OPCs protect and strengthen collagen and elastin.20-25 Theoretically, this could mean that OPCs are helpful for aging skin, and they are widely sold for this purpose, but there is as yet no direct evidence that the herbs work.

Hemorrhoids are varicose veins in and around the anus. Since OPCs are used to treat varicose veins, it is thought that this substance would also be helpful for people who have hemorrhoids. A randomized trial involving 84 people with hemorrhoids found that both the oral and topical forms of pycnogenol (pine bark extract) eased symptoms, including bleeding.68

One study suggests that while OPCs alone may not reduce levels of cholesterol, some benefits may occur when taken in combination with chromium.18

OPCs are strong antioxidants. Vitamin E defends against fat-soluble oxidants, and vitamin C neutralizes water-soluble ones, but OPCs are active against both types.5-7 Based on the (unproven) belief that antioxidants offer many health benefits, regular use of OPCs has been proposed as a measure to prevent cancer, diabetic neuropathy and diabetic retinopathy,48 and heart disease.37-40

OPCs have been tried as a treatment for impaired night vision,35,36,45 lupus (systemic lupus erythematosus),44 easy bruising,16,17 high blood pressure,43 and liver cirrhosis.49 However, more research needs to be performed to discover whether it actually provides any benefits in these conditions.

A double-blind, placebo-controlled study of questionable validity reported that use of OPCs from pine bark produced benefits in all symptoms of menopause.64

One study failed to find OPCs significantly helpful for weight loss.56 Another failed to find OPCs helpful for reducing the side effects of radiation therapy for breast cancer.61

A systematic review of 15 trials evaluated the possible effectiveness of OPCs from pine bark in treating chronic disorders.76 While the pooled results did not show the benefits of OPCs, 3 trials hinted that the supplement may be useful in people with osteoarthritis.


What Is the Scientific Evidence for Oligomeric Proanthocyanidins?

Venous Insufficiency (Varicose Veins)

There is fairly good preliminary evidence for the use of OPCs to treat people with symptoms of venous insufficiency.

A double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 71 subjects found that grape seed OPCs, taken at a dose of 100 mg 3 times daily, significantly improved major symptoms, including heaviness, swelling, and leg discomfort.27 Over a period of 1 month, 75% of the participants treated with OPCs improved substantially. This result doesn't seem quite so impressive when you note that significant improvement was also seen in 41% of the placebo group; nonetheless, OPCs still did significantly better than placebo.

A 2-month, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 40 people with chronic venous insufficiency found that 100 mg of pine bark OPCs 3 times daily significantly reduced edema, pain, and the sensation of leg heaviness.28 A similar study of 20 individuals also found OPCs from pine bark effective.29

A placebo-controlled study (blinding not stated) that enrolled 364 people with varicose veins found that treatment with grape seed OPCs produced statistically significant improvements as compared to baseline.30 There was a lesser response in the placebo group, but whether this difference was statistically significant was not stated.

In another study, 98 people with chronic venous insufficiency and edema were randomized to receive pycnogenol (150 mg/day), pycnogenol (150 mg) plus elastic stockings, or elastic stockings alone.74 After 8 weeks, the two groups that included pycenogenol had improvements in their symptoms compared with group using only elastic stockings, and the combination of pycnogenol and stockings was associated with the best results of all.

OPCs have also been compared against other natural treatments for venous insufficiency. A double-blind study of 50 people with varicose veins of the legs found that doses of 150 mg per day of grape seed OPCs were more effective in reducing symptoms and signs than the bioflavonoid diosmin.31 Similarly, a double-blind study of 39 people found pine bark OPCs more effective than the herb horse chestnut.46

Edema After Surgery or Injury

Breast cancer surgery often leads to swelling of the arm. A double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 63 post-operative breast cancer patients found that 600 mg of grape seed OPCs daily for 6 months reduced edema, pain, and peculiar sensations known as paresthesias.32 Also, in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 32 people who had received facial surgery, edema disappeared much faster in the group treated with grape seed OPCs.33

Another 10-day, double-blind, placebo-controlled study enrolling 50 participants found that grape seed OPCs improved the rate at which edema disappeared following sports injuries.34

Blood Clots After Plane Flights

It is commonly thought, though not proven, that the immobility endured during a long plane flight can lead to the development of potentially dangerous blood clots in the legs known as DVTs.57 Travelers at high risk are often recommended to take aspirin to "thin" their blood prior to flying.

One crossover study of 22 smokers found that 100 mg of OPCs had an equivalent blood thinning effect as 500 mg of aspirin.58 On the basis of this, a large double-blind study was performed to evaluate whether OPCs from pine bark could help reduce risk of blood clots on long airplane flights.59 The study followed 198 people thought to be at high risk for blood clots. Some participants were given 200 mg of OPCs 2 to 3 hours prior to the flight, 200 mg 6 hours later, and 100 mg the next day; while others received placebo at the same schedule. The average flight length was about 8 hours. The results indicated that use of OPCs significantly reduced risk of blood clots. There were five cases of DVTs or superficial thrombosis in the placebo group, as compared to none in the OPC group, a difference that was statistically significant.

Another substantial double-blind study (204 participants) found benefit with a product that contains OPCs combined with nattokinase.63 Nattokinase, also known as natto, is an extract of fermented soy thought to have some blood clot dissolving properties.

Periodontal Disease

Inflammation of the gums (gingivitis) and plaque formation lead to periodontal disease, one of the most common causes of tooth loss. A 14-day, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 40 people evaluated the potential benefits of a chewing gum product containing 5 mg of OPCs from pine bark.47 Use of the OPC gum resulted in significant improvements in gum health and reductions in plaque formation; no similar benefits were seen in the placebo group.

Atherosclerosis

Although there are no reliable human studies, animal evidence suggests that OPCs can slow or reverse atherosclerosis.37-40 This suggests (but definitely does not prove) that OPCs might be helpful for preventing heart disease.
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Re: Is OPC-3 the most powerful antioxidant in the world?

Postby Scepcop » 18 Oct 2012, 21:31

I found the equivalent of OPC-3 by OptiHealth for cheaper. Their product, called OPCXtra, appears to have the same ingredients as Market America's product, plus it includes a bonus green tea extract, and it's only $39.95 rather than $60 or $70. The reviews for it on Amazon.com seem to be very positive and say that it's just as good as Market America's product.

http://www.amazon.com/OPCXtra-TM-Isoton ... Descending

Manufacturer's website and store:

http://www.optihealthproducts.com/produ ... escription

There's also a French company that sells OPC with the same ingredients and also at around $39. They claim that their OPC ingredients are from France and therefore better, since OPC was invented there. They have a lot of detailed info on their website and store.

http://www.opc-1-2-3.com

If any of you decide to try it out, here are the dosage instructions for taking it.

http://mpiteam.com/HAS/HAS/follow-up_fi ... ctions.pdf

Easy to understand info on the benefits of OPC in layman's terms.

http://www.opc.cc/opc-faq.html
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Re: OPC-3: The most powerful antioxidant in the world?

Postby Scepcop » 26 Oct 2012, 13:31

Well as I suspected, the claims about OPC-3 are definitely true. After ordering OPC-3 and taking my first double dose (aka a "loading dose"), I felt a surge of energy and mental clarity. I felt like energy and vitality were flowing through me. It was like my body was what it was 20 years ago. Amazing! I was mesmerized! When your body's circulation is flowing better, your mental clarity and alertness are improved as well, so both mind and body were benefited from this product, which contains 5 powerful antioxidants.

To put it to the test, I tried jogging and exercising and found that I could go 3 or 4 times as long without getting tired. So the result is definitely real and physiologically testable, and not just some placebo effect. I am definitely a believer now, or a knower rather. I gave a double dose to my mom too, and a few hours later her constant drowsiness and yawning stopped. No joke. Usually I prefer debunking and bashing things, not promoting or praising them, so for me to praise something, it's gotta be really really good! Seriously.

Even mainstream medical doctors admit that OPC does improve the body's circulation, because it's a proven scientific fact. Here is an example from the website of a mainstream MD:

http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/QAA400126/O ... -ADHD.html

Anyway, I would definitely recommend this product. It does work and it does help a lot. There is no way that me being able to jog 3 times longer than usual is just a placebo effect. Besides greatly improving circulation and mental alertness, the product also boosts your immune system and repairs damage from free radicals, so it will prolong your lifespan and slow the aging process as well.

You can get it for cheaper than from Market America from these other manufacturers below:

http://www.optihealthproducts.com/produ ... escription

http://www.opc-1-2-3.com/

Note: I do NOT have any affiliation or vested interest in promoting OPC.

If you decide to try it out, here are the dosage instructions:

http://mpiteam.com/HAS/HAS/follow-up_fi ... ctions.pdf
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Re: OPC-3: The most powerful antioxidant in the world?

Postby NinjaPuppy » 26 Oct 2012, 20:17

Very interesting. Keep us posted on any long term effects. I may try this on my husband. ;)
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Re: OPC-3: The most powerful antioxidant in the world?

Postby Arouet » 26 Oct 2012, 20:31

I don't know if it works or not, Scepcop (and I'm not saying it doesn't, I simply don't know) but I don't know how you can say that your results couldn't be due to placebo effect. Frankly, it seems like exactly the situation where the effect would apply.

But I'm glad you're feeling good!
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Re: OPC-3: The most powerful antioxidant in the world?

Postby Scepcop » 18 Nov 2012, 00:55

Arouet wrote:I don't know if it works or not, Scepcop (and I'm not saying it doesn't, I simply don't know) but I don't know how you can say that your results couldn't be due to placebo effect. Frankly, it seems like exactly the situation where the effect would apply.

But I'm glad you're feeling good!


Even the establishment acknowledges the benefit of antioxidants. Did you see the links above? This is totally scientific and backed by research as well as testimonials. Nothing pseudo about it.

Regardless of why something works, if it works then it works. That's the most important thing.

Here is a company website about the French pine bark ingredient called pycnogenol, one of the key ingredients in OPC-3 which is 50 times more powerful than vitamin C.

http://www.pycnogenol.com
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Re: OPC-3: The most powerful antioxidant in the world?

Postby Arouet » 18 Nov 2012, 02:10

Scepcop wrote:Even the establishment acknowledges the benefit of antioxidants. Did you see the links above? This is totally scientific and backed by research as well as testimonials. Nothing pseudo about it.


I didn't say that there are no health benefits to anti-oxidents. What I said what that your anecdotal reports of feeling better after taking it could very well be placebo. You suggested it couldn't. But its the epitome of situations where the placebo effect could apply.
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Re: OPC-3: The most powerful antioxidant in the world?

Postby really? » 18 Nov 2012, 12:00

What Arouet said is true.
Testimonials should not be trusted alone, but must be backed up to determine efficacy through clinical trials
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Re: OPC-3: The most powerful antioxidant in the world?

Postby Scepcop » 26 Nov 2012, 13:03

Btw, antioxidants help with weight loss and fat burning too. See these articles below. So if OPC is the most powerful antioxidant in the world, then it would be beneficial for weight loss as well. After taking it, I do seem to be burning fat better and have lost a fair amount of weight.

http://www.livestrong.com/article/33671 ... ioxidants/

http://www.weight-loss-center.net/weigh ... ight-loss/

http://www.ehow.com/about_5183736_antio ... -loss.html

http://www.womenshealthmag.com/nutritio ... dant-foods
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Re: OPC-3: The most powerful antioxidant in the world?

Postby Scepcop » 26 Nov 2012, 13:06

really? wrote:What Arouet said is true.
Testimonials should not be trusted alone, but must be backed up to determine efficacy through clinical trials


What if no one will fund these trials? So I shouldn't do anything unless establishment interests are funding and backing something? No way. You're essentially saying that something isn't legit unless it's profitable enough for big pharma to run clinical trials on and invest in. That's dumb.

The most important testimonial is your own. If it works for you, that's the bottom line, regardless of clinical trials or what others say.
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Re: OPC-3: The most powerful antioxidant in the world?

Postby NinjaPuppy » 26 Nov 2012, 21:03

really? wrote:What Arouet said is true.
Testimonials should not be trusted alone, but must be backed up to determine efficacy through clinical trials


Scepcop wrote:What if no one will fund these trials? So I shouldn't do anything unless establishment interests are funding and backing something? No way. You're essentially saying that something isn't legit unless it's profitable enough for big pharma to run clinical trials on and invest in. That's dumb.

The most important testimonial is your own. If it works for you, that's the bottom line, regardless of clinical trials or what others say.

IMO, you are both correct here. I prefer knowing that others took the plunge and tried out something before I consider taking it. However, when it comes to trying something that isn't chemically created (herbal or 'natural') that I might be missing from my diet, I have no qualms about giving it a try.

I still believe that to start with, many problems can be solved with simple dietary changes and regular physical exercise. Avoiding problems can be a lot easier than fixing them.
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Re: OPC-3: The most powerful antioxidant in the world?

Postby Arouet » 26 Nov 2012, 21:12

Scepcop wrote:What if no one will fund these trials? So I shouldn't do anything unless establishment interests are funding and backing something? No way. You're essentially saying that something isn't legit unless it's profitable enough for big pharma to run clinical trials on and invest in. That's dumb.


Not having reliable evaluations at hand does not justify resorting to unreliable methods.

The most important testimonial is your own. If it works for you, that's the bottom line, regardless of clinical trials or what others say.


Honestly, SCEPCOP, you have no business evaluating when someone is being properly skeptical or not if you believe this.
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Re: Is OPC-3 the most powerful antioxidant in the world?

Postby Scepcop » 31 Jan 2013, 14:59

Arouet wrote:Any scientific studies on it?


Yes, see here:

http://www.shop.com/Isotonix+reg+OPC+3+ ... .xhtml#tx1

Scientific Studies Which Support Isotonix OPC-3®:

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Cesarone, M., et al. Improvement in Circulation and in Cardiovascular Risk Factors With a Proprietary Isotonic Bioflavanoid Formula OPC-3. Journal Angiology 59: 408-414, 2008.
Cho, K., et al. Effect of bioflavonoids extracted from the bark of Pinus maritima on proinflammatory cytokine interlukin-1 production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264. 7. Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology 168: 64-71, 2000.
Cho, K., et al. Inhibition mechanisms of bioflavonoids extracted from the bark of Pinus maritima on the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Annals of the NYAcademy of Sciences 928: 141-156, 2001.
Devaraj, S., et al. Supplementation with a pine bark extract rich in polyphenols increases plasma antioxidant capacity and alters the plasma lipoprotein profile. Lipids 37:931-4, 2002.
Fine, AM, Oligomeric proanthocyanidin complexes: history, structure, and phytopharmaceutical applications. Altern Med Rev 5:144-51, 2000.
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