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Men Were Last on Moon 40 Years Ago Today

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Men Were Last on Moon 40 Years Ago Today

Postby really? » 15 Dec 2012, 12:30

The last men to walk on the moon blasted off its surface for a final time 40 years ago today. After three days exploring the Taurus-Littrow lunar valley, Apollo 17 astronauts Eugene Cernan and Harrison Schmitt lit the engine on the upper (ascent) stage of their lunar module "Challenger" and launched off the surface at 5:55 p.m. EST (2255 GMT) on Dec. 14, 1972.

The last word spoken by a man on the moon (to date) — "Ignition" — was voiced by Schmitt, the first geologist and professional scientist to fly on a NASA mission. Cernan, as Apollo 17 commander, delivered the order to leave — "Let's get off" — just moments before.
More: http://www.space.com/18910-apollo-17-an ... -moon.html
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Re: Men Were Last on Moon 40 Years Ago Today

Postby SydneyPSIder » 15 Dec 2012, 20:12

no they weren't. where's the stars? or was that the first mission that actually made it? irregardless of radiation levels
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Re: Men Were Last on Moon 40 Years Ago Today

Postby ProfWag » 16 Dec 2012, 20:45

SydneyPSIder wrote:no they weren't. where's the stars? or was that the first mission that actually made it? irregardless of radiation levels

Do you know anything about light and camera exposure Syd?
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Re: Men Were Last on Moon 40 Years Ago Today

Postby The23rdman » 16 Dec 2012, 20:49

No he doesn't, but I do. :) It takes at least a 15 second exposure to capture stars and that would leave the module massively overexposed.
If you think you know what's going on you're probably full of shit - Robert Anton Wilson
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Re: Men Were Last on Moon 40 Years Ago Today

Postby Arouet » 16 Dec 2012, 21:29

The23rdman wrote:No he doesn't, but I do. :) It takes at least a 15 second exposure to capture stars and that would leave the module massively overexposed.


For those of us who also don't know much about light and camera exposure can you clarify the implications of this? From what I've read stars, despite seeming bright to us, are actually dim light from the perspective of a camera, and the light on the astronauts would actually be considered bright. So the camera was able to brightly pick up the astronauts but would have required the longer exposure to pick up the stars. Is that it?
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Re: Men Were Last on Moon 40 Years Ago Today

Postby The23rdman » 16 Dec 2012, 22:35

I'm away from my PC, but wanted to acknowledge I've seen this and will reply.
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Re: Men Were Last on Moon 40 Years Ago Today

Postby The23rdman » 17 Dec 2012, 01:36

Okay, in essence the stars will be at least 5 stops darker than the module. What this means is you have a choice - you can have the module perfectly exposed and a black sky or the stars visible and the module blown to kingdom come. The only way to expose for both is to light them separately. With film you're pretty limited unlike today and also shooting 70mm would make it all but impossible because you'd need such a long exposure.

Incidentally, I feel there is some mileage in the theory that some of the shots were hoaxed as from a pure photographic perspective there does appear to be more than one light source and the classic shot in the spotlight looks pretty dodgy.
If you think you know what's going on you're probably full of shit - Robert Anton Wilson
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Re: Men Were Last on Moon 40 Years Ago Today

Postby NinjaPuppy » 17 Dec 2012, 01:44

The23rdman wrote:Incidentally, I feel there is some mileage in the theory that some of the shots were hoaxed as from a pure photographic perspective there does appear to be more than one light source and the classic shot in the spotlight looks pretty dodgy.

Another WOOHOO! for our side! Now let's all sit back and see what ProfWag's got to say about this.
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Re: Men Were Last on Moon 40 Years Ago Today

Postby The23rdman » 17 Dec 2012, 01:48

I'm not taking sides, btw, and I'm not jumping from some photos appear to have been faked to we didn't go to the moon. ;)
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Re: Men Were Last on Moon 40 Years Ago Today

Postby NinjaPuppy » 17 Dec 2012, 01:53

The23rdman wrote:I'm not taking sides, btw, and I'm not jumping from some photos appear to have been faked to we didn't go to the moon. ;)

Totally understood. Don't let my overwhelming joy worry you. I just can't resist any opportunity to taunt ProfWag. :lol:
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Re: Men Were Last on Moon 40 Years Ago Today

Postby Arouet » 17 Dec 2012, 04:12

Ok, once we finish with the radiation issue in the other thread why don't we do that angle next?
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Re: Men Were Last on Moon 40 Years Ago Today

Postby The23rdman » 17 Dec 2012, 04:39

Sure. I'll take some time to look at both arguments and see if they stand up purely from a photographic perspective. I'll admit I've only given them a cursory look up till now because I'm more interested in health care than moon landings.
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Re: Men Were Last on Moon 40 Years Ago Today

Postby really? » 17 Dec 2012, 04:42

Arouet wrote:
The23rdman wrote:No he doesn't, but I do. :) It takes at least a 15 second exposure to capture stars and that would leave the module massively overexposed.


For those of us who also don't know much about light and camera exposure can you clarify the implications of this? From what I've read stars, despite seeming bright to us, are actually dim light from the perspective of a camera, and the light on the astronauts would actually be considered bright. So the camera was able to brightly pick up the astronauts but would have required the longer exposure to pick up the stars. Is that it?


Quite right arouet. The lunar environment would be much much brighter than the background stars. So to get a correct exposure of the landscape and module a low Fstop plus shutter speed would had to be used to not over expose the module.... A earthly example would be looking into a tunnel to see what's inside on a bright sunny day. Photographing stars even with todays fast films requires more that a few seconds of time noticeably greater the the 1/250th of a second required for photos on the Moon. I'd imagine back in 69-74 film speeds were slower requiring more time to photographing stars properly.
The Apollo 11 Hasselblad Cameras
http://sterileeye.com/2009/07/23/the-ap ... d-cameras/
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