View Active Topics          Latest 100 Topics          View Your Posts          Switch to Mobile

Debunking Conspiracy Theories In 'Voodoo Histories'

Discuss Conspiracies and Cover Ups - e.g. 9/11 Truth, JFK Assassination, New World Order, Roswell, Moon Hoax, Secret Societies, etc. whatever conspiracy floats your boat.

Debunking Conspiracy Theories In 'Voodoo Histories'

Postby really? » 23 Aug 2012, 21:50

Podcast http://www.npr.org/templates/story/stor ... =123127032

When a co-worker told him that he believed Neil Armstrong's 1969 moon walk actually took place on a Hollywood soundstage, journalist David Aaronovitch was appalled. Aaronovitch had seen the moon landing on TV when he was a kid, and he couldn't believe anyone would think it was a hoax.

"He told me about the photographs that don't make sense, and the stars that aren't there, and the flag flapping in the nonexistent breeze, and so on," Aaronovitch tells Guy Raz.

At the time, Aaronovitch wasn't prepared with evidence to counter his co-worker's claim, but today he is. Aaronovitch spent six years looking into the details behind top conspiracy theories such as the faked Apollo moon landing and has come out with a new book to forensically debunk each of them.

Aaronovitch's rebuttal is called Voodoo Histories: The Role of the Conspiracy Theory in Shaping Modern History. In the book, Aaronovitch tackles the intriguing question of why well-educated, reasonable people sometimes believe "perfectly ridiculous things." (Read a list, from Aaronovitch's book, of a few of the common characteristics shared by many conspiracy theories.)

"The notion that a large number of people that believe in conspiracy theories are just wackos just simply doesn't fit," he says.

His personal favorite? Aaronovitch says he always liked the conspiracy that Hitler himself set fire to Berlin's Reichstag building in 1933 so that he would have an excuse to suspend civil liberties in Germany.

Aaronovitch says that while researching the book, he discovered "that the Reichstag was set on fire by the single man who said he did it, said all the way through the trial that he was the only person who did it, and went to his execution saying that he didn't understand why everyone was trying to say it was the Nazis or the Communists."

Aaronovitch points out that this is a classic example of Occam's razor — the simplest explanation was actually true.

Aaronovitch says conspiracy theories are fashionable across the globe. And while the one your neighbor insists upon — that the fluoride in the drinking water is actually a mind-control experiment by the government — might be a harmless variation, some have serious consequences.

"If you are to travel in Pakistan, for instance, you will find that a significant proportion of the educated Pakistanis believe that George Bush brought down the twin towers," says Aaronovitch. "And that makes dealing with the [Pakistani] Taliban difficult because they actually don't believe the fundamental premise on which the war against terror was waged."

The conspiracy that Sept. 11 was an inside job is just one example of a theory that has molded our view of history. In his book, Aaronovitch explores almost a dozen other popular conspiracies, such as the secret Zionist world empire, the assassination of Princess Diana, and the Priory of Scion's mission to safeguard the bloodline of Jesus
really?
 
Posts: 1009
Joined: 06 Mar 2010, 20:58






Re: Debunking Conspiracy Theories In 'Voodoo Histories'

Postby jmtalboo » 30 Oct 2012, 05:09

Recently Dorothy Robinson of the Metro newspaper in NYC informed us that "Life is not a ‘24’ episode," she states:

Pearl Harbor. 9/11. The assassination of John F. Kennedy. Many people don’t believe what’s recounted in the history books. In 'Voodoo Histories,' British author David Aaronovitch takes on those conspiracy theorists.

Reply:

Dorothy and the Wizard of Bunk
http://911debunkers.blogspot.com/2010/0 ... -bunk.html
User avatar
jmtalboo
 
Posts: 8
Joined: 09 Feb 2012, 02:45

Re: Debunking Conspiracy Theories In 'Voodoo Histories'

Postby SydneyPSIder » 30 Oct 2012, 20:25

"He told me about the photographs that don't make sense, and the stars that aren't there, and the flag flapping in the nonexistent breeze, and so on," Aaronovitch tells Guy Raz.


So why the hell didn't he consider the evidence in front of him? There's something deeply wrong with someone who can see a flag flapping in a breeze and say they must be standing on an airless moon. Plus hatches too small for astronauts to get through, back lighting, incorrect shadows for a distant sun, etc etc.

He must have a problem with denial or something.

So I suspect his 'work' is largely a waste of time, and he may even have been put forward as a useful tool to 'condition' people into discrediting alternative theories and explanations so they won't question WTC7 so much.
SydneyPSIder
 
Posts: 1124
Joined: 10 Sep 2012, 18:24

Re: Debunking Conspiracy Theories In 'Voodoo Histories'

Postby Scepcop » 02 Nov 2012, 17:55

Typical claptrap: Assume that all conspiracies are the concoction of mentally disturbed people and ignore all the evidence. Christian fundamentalists do that too when they can't refute the evidence against their claims. Typical religious mindset. Not objective at all. A real truth seeker and skeptic discusses the evidence, rather than use cheap tactics like that, which assume at the outset that all conspiracies are false by default, which is unjustified.
“Devotion to the truth is the hallmark of morality; there is no greater, nobler, more heroic form of devotion than the act of a man who assumes the responsibility of thinking.” - Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged
User avatar
Scepcop
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3256
Joined: 16 May 2009, 07:29

Re: Debunking Conspiracy Theories In 'Voodoo Histories'

Postby Arouet » 02 Nov 2012, 21:48

Scepcop wrote:Typical claptrap: Assume that all conspiracies are the concoction of mentally disturbed people and ignore all the evidence..


I'm not sure why you're writing this since the book seems to take the position that people who believe these things are NOT necessarily mentally disturbed, but can be quite well-educated and intelligent.

Akso the blurb suggests that the book does go into the evidence against these conspiracy theories.
User avatar
Arouet
 
Posts: 2544
Joined: 07 Aug 2010, 03:07

Re: Debunking Conspiracy Theories In 'Voodoo Histories'

Postby really? » 02 Nov 2012, 22:50

Scepcop wrote:Typical claptrap: Assume that all conspiracies are the concoction of mentally disturbed people and ignore all the evidence. Christian fundamentalists do that too when they can't refute the evidence against their claims. Typical religious mindset. Not objective at all. A real truth seeker and skeptic discusses the evidence, rather than use cheap tactics like that, which assume at the outset that all conspiracies are false by default, which is unjustified.


As quoted from the article
In the book, Aaronovitch tackles the intriguing question of why well-educated, reasonable people sometimes believe "perfectly ridiculous things."


All CT's throughout history are false by default until evidence permits a non false history .

Excerpt: 'Voodoo Histories'

by David Aaronovitch
The Ties That Bind

What is evident from these examples is that true conspiracies are either elevated in their significance through exaggeration, or are in reality seemingly dogged by failure and discovery. That Richard Nixon, the leader of the most powerful nation on earth, could not even manage to get a few incriminating tapes wiped clean exemplifies most real conspiracies. Conspiracy theories, on the other hand, are often more successful at achieving their aims. As I researched the dozen major conspiracy theories that form the body of this book, I began to see that they shared certain characteristics that ensured their wide spread propagation.

1. HISTORICAL PRECEDENT

As has already been noted, conspiracists work hard to convince people that conspiracy is everywhere. An individual theory will seem less improbable if an entire history of similar cases can be cited. These can be as ancient as the Gunpowder Plot of 1605, and today may include references to Pearl Harbor, the Reichstag fire, and the 1965 Gulf of Tonkin incident. The plot to murder JFK is first base if you want to convince people that RFK and MLK were also murdered by arms of the American state.
When examining some of the biographies of those involved in the 9/11 Truth movement, I was struck by how this normalization works over time. One energetic woman in her forties, who had become an indefatigable activist in the Californian branch of the lobby, described how she had become convinced of the 9/11 conspiracy. In her youth, she told her sympathizers, she had sailed around the world, but her "political activism" had only begun in 1992, when she saw a film "which disturbed her" and as a consequence of which she began to do her own research on the government and media. The film was Oliver Stone's JFK.

2. SKEPTICS AND SHEEPLE

A conspiracy theory is likely to be politically populist, in that it usually claims to lay bare an action taken by a small power elite against the people. Or, as a Californian professor of theology could tell an audience at the Copenhagen central library with regard to 9/11: "Members of the elite of our society may not think that the truth should be revealed." By contrast, belief in the conspiracy makes you part of a genuinely heroic elite group who can see past the official version duplicated for the benefit of the lazy or inert mass of people by the powers that be. There will usually be an emphasis on the special quality of thought required to appreciate the existence of the conspiracy. The conspiracists have cracked the code, not least because of their possession of an unusual and perceptive way of looking at things. Those who cannot or will not see the truth are variously described as robots or, latterly, as sheeple — citizens who shuffle half awake through their conventional lives. More : http://www.npr.org/templates/story/stor ... #123127943
really?
 
Posts: 1009
Joined: 06 Mar 2010, 20:58

Re: Debunking Conspiracy Theories In 'Voodoo Histories'

Postby SydneyPSIder » 03 Nov 2012, 09:56

really? wrote:All CT's throughout history are false by default until evidence permits a non false history .

No, they're not. Postmodernist theory tells us they are all 'claims to the truth' which are equally valid as claims and may be closer to the actual truth than any 'official' account. Officials often have a strong motivation to lie, out of expediency, self-enrichment, ambition, empire-building and maintaining, ass-covering, fear, chain of command, a bigger agenda where they need to pull the wool over people's eyes, acting on behalf of the elites or other vested power interests, etc. The truth is often the first casualty in officialdom, as they spin the reality and brief the public on a 'need to know basis'. At the very least, relatively 'honest' govts lie to the public about their bungles because they want to retain power as a political party and get re-elected -- so bury all their mistakes. And what about tendering scandals and 'jobs for the boys' etc, when a large amount of money is held on behalf of the public to be spent. That's assuming there aren't even bigger agendas afoot by rogue agencies like the CIA and FBI, known to be agents provocateurs domestically and around the world. So much for the hope of so-called 'democracy'.

"All power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely". The temptation is just too great for humans to abuse power and authority. I would be more inclined to believe a well-reasoned alternative 'conspiracy theory' that is backed up by strong evidence -- or even deep suspicion in the case of bizarre anomalies in the public account and evidence -- as often as not.

A journalist speaker at a recent talk pointed out that it was a tragedy for career-builders in the CIA and FBI and NSA etc when the US 'accidentally won the Cold War against Russia' -- they were all out of a job with their high-paid positions and busy work and speechifying unless they could come up with a new enemy or two, and quickly. Such is the nature of bureaucracy and people's deep-seated need for ongoing personal income and security and status -- all motivators for 'conspiracies'.

The irony of the lengthy quotation made in the previous post of the author's work about what makes a CT is gob-smacking -- what is described as some kind of false heuristic or belief system is exactly what happens in reality.

For instance, take a look at this article about a recently exposed incestuous conspiracy amongst members of the 'Labor' party in Australia who share a lot of shady connections and arrangements in common, and were participating basically in insider trading on mining licenses to make sure they could cash in on the benefits of those licenses -- everything from buying land where claims were going to be made to leaking details to likely mining companies to buying up shares in those companies as a 'multi-bagger'. Some people admittedly do like reading about such investigations because they are appalled and a little thrilled by the revelations that 'the state' clearly IS deeply corrupt and IS abusing its power, connections and inside knowledge. The investigative journalist, Kate McClymont, is a legend at the SMH for uncovering crime after crime as a reporter, having a mind like a steel trap, and of course all leaks come to her.

Multi-baggers and old mates

October 27, 2012

The 'Labor Show Trials' starting next week will examine the deals of a close circle of business and government allies, write Kate McClymont and Linton Besser.

http://www.smh.com.au/data-point/multib ... z2B9NGuETX


The Power Index: journos, Kate McClymont at #8

Matthew Knott | Oct 16, 2012 12:48PM

[...] Sydney’s shonks and crooks, however, know better than to question her nose for news — as do her media colleagues and competitors.

“She’s considered to have magical powers because all these stories seem to effortlessly drift towards her,” former senior Herald writer David Marr explains. “She’s revered inside the paper.”

According to The Age’s Nick McKenzie, McClymont is the “investigative reporter’s investigative reporter”. She doesn’t moralise and doesn’t self-aggrandise. She prises information out of people, unearths facts, joins the dots — all while retaining her famously impish sense of humour.

“Kate McClymont should be employed at Guantanamo Bay,” Marr says. “She has this ruthless charm that makes people talk to her — it’s chemical.”

McClymont’s forensic stories on the dodgy inner workings of the Health Services Union’s East branch — detailing alleged cronyism, nepotism and secret commissions — helped spark a NSW police inquiry and forced national president Michael Williamson off the ALP national executive.

Reporting by McClymont and colleague Linton Besser also precipitated Independent Commission Against Corruption inquiries into former NSW Labor powerbroker Eddie Obeid’s role in the acquisition of harbour front and mining leases. This followed past scoops exposing salary cap rorting at the Canterbury Bulldogs — which saw the team stripped of premiership points — and systematic overcharging at Keddies, NSW’s largest personal injury firm.

It was tales of her Kings Cross escapades that convinced then-Herald editor Eric Beecher and editor-in-chief Chris Anderson to offer the 25-year-old a cadetship in 1985. Barring a brief stint at Four Corners, she’s worked there ever since and has become a lightning rod for crime and corruption stories. It’s a fact that still surprises, and amuses, her.

“I rarely go out drinking with police or criminals, I don’t loiter around pubs,” she says. “A chief of staff once told me: ‘you are the least likely person to do the things you do’.”

She even develops, in the words of one former colleague, “bizarrely friendly relationships with the victims of her stories” who later ask her to do a job on their underworld rivals.

“I always try to be polite,” she says, “because I don’t want them to kill me.”

“If my phone didn’t ring between now and Christmas I’d have more than enough. If your name becomes known, people ring you; you become their port of call.”

In 2009, businessman Michael McGurk arranged a lunch meeting with McClymont to tell her he feared for his life. A week later he was gunned down.

Her investigation into Michael Williamson was also sparked by an out-of-the-blue call; this time from a private school parent bemused by the union leader’s lavish lifestyle.

McClymont and her family also had to move house after she received death threats over her Bulldogs stories; they had to hire a security guard after stories about McGurk.


Basically, the idiot pseudo-thinker and pseudo-author referenced in the OP and the previous post is simply exhorting the public to 'trust in authority, always trust the official story, never question anything, and anyone who does anything investigative or doubts the bizarre official account is pretty well crazy, and you don't want to be considered crazy, now do you? Just go with the flow and keep your head down. Believe me when I tell you, there is no incentive in govt or any other institution, whether affiliated with govt or otherwise, for collusion, feather-bedding, corruption, ambition or wrong-doing. The elites are perennially driven to get ever richer by any means, but they are honest and law-abiding and will give you a break. Just trust me, because I've written a book about it'. What a tool and shill for the elites. Cue the Orwellian 1984 society...
SydneyPSIder
 
Posts: 1124
Joined: 10 Sep 2012, 18:24


Return to Conspiracies / Cover Ups

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests